If It’s Cloudy or Rainy, It Must Be Our Day Off!

One of the perks of most workamping positions is that you receive at least two consecutive days off each week. Such is our schedule here at Atlantic Oaks in Eastham, Massachusetts; however, this is the third week in a row where one, if not both, of our days off has been cloudy and/or rainy! Thus, we are becoming adept at finding things to do on the Cape in less-than-ideal weather conditions!

FullSizeRender (114)Today, after our scrumptious brunch at Hangar B Eatery (see my previous blog post!), we traveled into downtown Chatham for a quick stop at Gustare Oils and Vinegars.  This is an awesome shop filled with numerous varieties of both olive oils and vinegars, all available for tasting. We had visited the store in early May when we arrived in Cape Cod and the bottle of Herbes de Provence Olive Oil that I purchased then is now close to empty. Needless to say, the shop was packed today with tasters, but I was able to grab my choices, taste one more variety, and receive a new recipe, which is included in every purchase! We strolled down the main street of Chatham, stopped in a few of our favorite stores, then headed out of town. I still feel that if I decided to settle on Cape Cod, Chatham would be my choice – ah, but no settling for us! We still have an awful lot of traveling and exploring to do!!

Since the rain was holding off, on our way back to Eastham, we turned off Route 6 to explore and hike in the Fort Hill Historic Area. Bill and I have completed several hikes here in Cape Cod, and we were discussing the hikes we have experienced elsewhere. For sure our best hiking experience took place in Utah, in several of the National Parks while workamping at Thousand Lakes RV Park. With no real structured pathways, we would follow the cairns and limited signage and walk sometimes close to 20 miles at a time. Then, last summer, we found several beautiful and challenging trails in northwest Michigan when we worked at Indigo Bluffs RV Resort and Campground. That is not to say that the hikes we have taken here in Cape Cod are not pleasurable, but rather they are somewhat shorter than we are used to and are very manicured and maintained – there are even boardwalk segments throughout the total trail.

IMG_1153Today we hiked the Fort Hill Trail and the Red Maple Swamp Trail, an offshoot of the Fort Hill Trail. The trails meander through meadows and provide magnificent vistas of the Nauset Marsh Area. At one point on the trail we noticed a stone with the letter “T” engraved on it and came to discover the stone marks the spot where Rev. Samuel Treat, the first minister of Eastham, built his house and served the people for 45 years, beginning in 1672. At another point on the trail, we viewed “Indian Rock,” a 2-ton rock that served as a community grinding stone for the Nauset Indians. The Red Maple Swamp portion of the hike was more of  a wooded area, which of course was cooler – and today, somewhat buggier! Notice the obstacle we had to maneuver while on the trail!IMG_1154

When we completed our hike, we walked over to the Penniman House, built in 1868 by Edward Penniman, a prominent whaler of the time. His family lived in the house for many years while Edward was off on whaling expeditions, but he was able to enjoy the home as well for an additional 30-plus years after retiring from the declining whaling industry. He welcomed family and visitors to his home through a whale jawbone gate! Imagine being swallowed by that mouth!

We did manage to get a little exercise and history in before the rain began again. Tomorrow’s forecast is not looking good, but I’m sure we’ll find another rainy day activity to enjoy on our day off!!

Stay Calm and Travel On…


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